iMessage's Impact, Part II

My previous post on iMessage's impact left me with a desire to see what the impact of iMessage would be as the iPhone continued to grow more popular. With the end of the latest billing cycle imminent, I pulled the last months' messaging data from AT&T, and generated this updated chart.

I now have over a year of messaging data, and the data suggests that iMessage has had a significant impact on my text messaging habits. If there's a single effect, or a few is not clear, but the overall impact is that I am texting less and iMessaging more. If we chart the year-over-year change in text messaging since iMessage's release, we get the following chart.

 I now have over a year of messaging data, and the data suggests that iMessage has had a significant impact on my text messaging habits. If there's a single effect, or a few is not clear, but the overall impact is that I am texting less and iMessaging more. If we chart the year-over-year change in text messaging since iMessage's release, we get the following chart. It's clear that since iMessage's introduction, I have never used more text messages. I've never even matched the text message volume in a month. A rough average looks to be that I send ~70% of the text messages as I did pre-iMessage. At this point, it seems that iMessage has resulted in a 30% reduction in the number of texts that I send. I predict that as time goes on, I'll continue to draw down my text message use. iMessage will only be hindered by smartphone adoption outside of iOS; if WP8 or Android provide stiff competition SMS may remain a necessary evil. But if not, iMessage will continue to eat into text messaging levels.